Back from the brink of extinction
  • Back from the brink of extinction

    The story of the photograph:

     

    A photograph of the Golden Lion Tamarins. They have been for centuries admired for their beauty. Together with deforestation, their stunning beauty has also been their curse. Illegal trading, poaching and deforestation brought this species that were endemic to the lowland Atlantic rainforest in the state of Rio de Janeiro, to the brink of extinction. In the 1980's a few individuals were discovered in small patches of remaining forest, and a comprehensive conservation program was established. Since then the population has increased from approximately 200 in 1985 to almost 3000 today, thanks to among others, the Associação Mico-Leão-Dourado (AMLD). Even though there are still many risks for this amazing monkey, the Golden Lion Tamarins are a great symbol of nature conservation and the efforts of bringing wildlife back from the brink of extinction. 

     

    About the photographer:

     

    Øistein Johannessen, born 18.09.1970, is an amateur nature and wildlife photographer from Norway. For three years Johannessen has been living in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. During this time there he started the Alive | Series, an initiative with the aim to support nature preservation and protection of the rainforests in Brazil by donating his own photos taken in various parts of the world. Through his photos, Johannessen tries to raise awareness and engagement for protecting wildlife and their habitats. In Brazil, his photos are mainly taken in the Atlantic rainforest, the Amazon and the Pantanal.

     

    IG: oistein_johannessen

    Website: Alive Series by Øistein Johannessen

    • Purchase price includes all printing and packaging costs. Total revenue is donated directly to reforestation projects.

       

      Sizing guide:

      Small 30x40cm 12x18 in
      Medium 40x60cm 16x24 in
      Large 50x75cm 20x30 in
      Extra large 60x90cm 24x36 in

       

      All prints are sold and shipped unframed. The photos are printed without the "Photograhy for Future" watermark.